Search by tag •Avesta•

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The future Saviour Astvat-Ereta – the Implementer of the Truth. Zoroastrianism

  • 19.10.2015
  • 131
  • 9157

We kindly offer everyone to turn our eyes again to the East which from time immemorial has been considered the cradle of Wisdom and Knowledge. Let’s speak of Zoroastrianism and the predictions left by Zarathustra and reflected in the Avesta.

Zoroastrianism (Mazdayasna, Mazdaism) is a very old religion that was formed on the basis of the teaching of Prophet Zarathustra (Zoroaster). The teaching is based on the concept of spiritual and moral freedom of every human being as embodied in good thoughts, good words and good deeds. This religion emerged in the territory of Greater Iran (Persia). The main sacred book of Zoroastrianism is the Avesta (Zend-Avesta) which supposedly consists of 21 texts that have not been preserved in full. Two of those were discovered and translated only in the 18th century. Researchers believe the information now contained in the Avesta was considerably distorted and modified in the Middle Ages. No wonder, for on the basis of the initial Knowledge the religion was established with its strict rules, ethical provisions, rituals, feasts, and other mandatory attributes. According to Zoroastrianism, the name of Messiah is Saoshyant, which in translation from the Avestan language means “the Future Saviour”.

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Avesta. Haiti 28. “I will pray for the works of the Holy Spirit...”

  • 02.12.2015
  • 61
  • 2407

Introduction

 

In humble adoration, with hands outstretched I pray to You, O Mazda! First of all, through Your Holy Spirit vouchsafe to me all righteousness of action, all wisdom of the Good Mind, that I may thereby bring joy to the Soul of Creation!

 

COMMENTARY: The Denkard says, “The first Ahunavaiti Gatha (Yasna 28) is dedicated to grace and piety of Zoroaster (Zarathustra) that emerged owing to the righteousness of his thoughts, words and deeds.” (Denkard 9:28:1) The triad of good thoughts, words and deeds is the foundation of the ethical teaching of Good Faith. Good thoughts, good words and good deeds of Pious Zarathustra are portrayed in his Gathas (Hymns) dedicated to the Immortal Saints (Amesha Spentas).

This dedication opens the first Chapter (Haiti) of the Gathas, which reflects Zarathustra’s prayer and righteousness, as well as his petitions of grace as proclaimed in the Avesta. (Denkard 9:50:2-3)

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Chinvat. The Bridge over the Abyss

  • 06.12.2015
  • 355
  • 13353

    In former times, Heaven and Earth, the two worlds symbolized by two riverbanks or seashores were integrated. Yet, once, as legends say, abysses and water appeared in between and separated them. Nonetheless, a single path remained, which connected the two sides, the mundane world and the heavenly world. The path is narrow and dangerous, but it’s the only one available, and it runs over a bridge.  

    The bridge image is similar to the image of an axial pillar or the world tree connecting heaven and earth and simultaneously maintaining their separation; thus it may also be regarded as a vertical or the axis mundi. A vertical bridge connects the earth not just with the higher world, but with the lower one, too. At the bridge leading to the lower world, a guard is often standing (e.g., a zoomorphic creature), who lets deceased (or living who have dared to visit the kingdom of death) pass, in exchange for a certain recompense, solution of a given riddle, or successful withstanding of a given test. At that, the downward bridge is one of rare images. There are more frequent images of the bridge along which souls of deceased get to paradise (the direction of such bridge is not always identified). In this respect, the bridge symbolism is identical to that of a ladder. Just like the world tree, ladder or axis mundi, the bridge connects different planes of existence. The side which the bridge runs from is our world, while the other side is the primordial world, the world of God, the world of genuine reality, the area of immortality.

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Angkor Wat. Architecture, frescoes and sacral numbers 7 and 72

  • 29.03.2016
  • 208
  • 11399

    I’ve decided to carry out a deeper analysis of information relating to secrets and mysteries of the sacred city of Angkor Wat in Cambodia after reading the article The revealed secrets of Angkor and Giza plateau – the pendulum of Orion and Draco. Apocalypse now?, recently published on this website. While preparing this material I discovered plenty of interesting data that I intend to share herein. Thus, Angkor Wat is a giant temple complex and the largest religious monument in the world. The complex is included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Angkor occupies the area of about 200 square kilometres, whereas recent studies indicate its area could be around 3,000 square kilometres with a population of some half a million people, making it the largest settlement of its time. The temple complex was constructed as three concentric right-angled buildings, the height of which increases towards the centre. The temple is surrounded by a wall of 1.5×1.3 km and an artificial moat filled with water, 3.6 km long and 190 m wide. The internal building consists of five towers and resembles a lotus flower. The central building rises 65 m above the ground.

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Consciousness and Personality.
From the inevitably dead
to the eternally alive
  • <small>Consciousness and Personality. <br/>From the inevitably dead <br/>to the eternally alive</small>

    02.08.2017

The Truth is One for Everybody
  • The coming cataclysms. Relations between people. Revival of humaneness

    10.07.2016

  • Illusion and the Way

    25.07.2016

  • LIFE

    31.07.2016

Project Aim

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